Nutritious Life

Brining Nutrition to Daily Life

Carbohydrates and total energy in various foods March 28, 2009

Filed under: All,General,Nutritional Information — nutritiouslife12 @ 3:00 am
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Carbohydrate needs increase for active people. Athletes should consume 55-60% of their total energy as carbohydrates. Consuming carbohydrates with in the first few hours of recovery can maximize carbohydrate storage rates.

Good sources include: whole grains, fruits, vegetables, 100% fruit juices (with no added sugar) and whole grain cereals.

 

Here is a chart below that includes carbohydrates and their total energy:

 

Food Serving Size Carbohydrate (g) Energy from Carbohydrate (%) Total Energy (kcal)
apple sauce 1 cup 50 97% 207
large apple 1 each 50 82% 248
whole wheat bread 1 oz slice 50 71% 282
brown rice-cooked 1 cup 100 88% 450
spaghetti- cooked 1 cup 50 75% 268
grape nuts cereal 1/2 cup 100 84% 473
mixed vegetables 1/2 cup 100 88% 450
 

Cookies vs. Bananas and Strawberries February 19, 2009

When we eat, we want to choose foods that are high in nutrient density. This means eating the foods that give you the highest amount of nutrients for the least amount of energy (calories). Assume we had 3 cookies in one cookiesbananas-and-strawberriesbowl and a banana and strawberries in another bowl and each bowl consisted of 150 calories. As you might conclude the bananas and strawberries are far more nutrient dense and supplies us with more nourishment per calorie.

 I believe eating more nutrient dense foods (fruits, vegetables, whole grains, brown rice…) is a better way to live. If we were to eat 2000 calories a day and it was filled with fast food, soda and candy we are going to be overweight and unhealthy. If we were to eat 2000 calories consisting of whole grains, fruits and vegetable, we would be healthier and have more energy. Some might think calories are just calories, but they aren’t. Sugar, fast food and processed products don’t offer any real nutrition leaving us tired and hungry for more. Eating fruits, vegetable and whole grains we are more likely to have more energy and feel fuller longer.

I challenge you for one week to take all the processed foods out of your life and eat more nutrient dense foods. Take note of how you feel and how much energy you have.

 

Carbohydrates December 30, 2008

fruits and vegetablesNow a days people are always trying to watch their carb intake. What you need to know is that we need to eat carbs to keep our body functioning. We are required to eat at least 130 grams of carbs a day just to supply energy to our nerve cells, including those of the brain. Instead of cutting carbs out of our diet we need to take out the bad carbs and add more good carbs to our diet. Examples of good carbs would be: fruits, vegetables, whole grains, brown rice and sweet potatoes.  Examples of bad carbs would be refined sugar, sodas, white breads and white pastas.

We should realize that carbs don’t make us fat… it is all the sugar and all the processed foods that make us fat.

Cutting carbs greatly reduces our nutrient intake.  People may lose weight on these low carb/no carb diets, but it is not a healthy way to lose weight.  Not to mention when you don’t have enough carbs you get irritable and shaky. Who wants to feel that way?!

When we consume enough good carbs it helps prevent the production of ketones as an alternative energy source. Excessive ketones can result in high blood acidity and ketoacidosis, which alters basic body functions and damages tissue.

People are always looking for that quick fix and to tell you the truth there is no quick fix and there will probably never been one. The best thing you can do is change your eating habits and exercise daily to keep healthy.

Remember you can never go wrong with too many fruits, vegetables and whole grains in your diet.

 

5 Healthy Holiday Foods December 25, 2008

Merry Christmas! I will keep this short so you can get back to opening presents!

5 Healthy Holiday Foods

Yams are high in vitamin C, dietary fiber, vitamin B6, potassium, and manganese; while being low in saturated fat and sodium

Green beans are an excellent source of vitamin K, vitamin C, manganese, vitamin A, dietary fiber, potassium, folate, and iron

Nuts are the best plant source of protein not to mention they are rich in fiber, phytonutrients and antioxidants like as vitamin E and selenium

Whole Grains (stone ground wheat, oats, brown rice) are a good source of B vitamins, vitamin E, magnesium, iron and fiber

Homemade Mulled Apple Cider is high in antioxidants, but be careful, you are better off eating an apple than drinking many cups of apple cider since apple cider is concentrated

 

 
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