Nutritious Life

Brining Nutrition to Daily Life

Easy Energy Article February 27, 2009

I found this article and really liked it and wanted to share (espeically to those who run long distance):

http://www.active.com/nutrition/Articles/Easy_Energy.htm?act=EMC-Active&Vehicle=Running&Date=2_25_09&Edition=2&Sections=Articles&Creative=Easy_Energy&TextName=More&ArtText=Txt&Placement=3&Dy=Thu

 

Here are a few key points that I thought were important:

– re-fueled with orange slices, LifeSavers, and Fig Newtons (I recommend whole wheat fig newtons)

-recommends snacks that are as close to whole foods as possible

– avoid ingredients such as partially hydrogenated oils, high fructose corn syrup, and artificial dyes

– “Sucking on hard candy during a long run or marathon can be a nice alternative to energy gels”

– suggests adding one half cup of orange juice (which contains the electrolyte potassium) and a pinch of salt (sodium) to four cups of water

 

How Alcohol is Absorbed and Metabolized February 25, 2009

 

 

A few facts about how the body absorbs and metabolizes alcohol:

 

          Alcohol does not require any digestion and is absorbed directly from the stomach and the small intestine

          Alcohol is broken down in the liver

          A small amount of alcohol is metabolized in the stomach before it has been absorbed

          Once absorbed, alcohol moves through the blood stream to the liver (where is it broken down)alcohol-picture

          An average, healthy adult metabolizes the equivalent of one drink per hour

          Drinking more than one drink per hour you expose every tissue in your body to the toxic    effects of alcohol

          Consuming foods with some fat, protein and fiber helps to slow the absorption of alcohol and can reduce blood alcohol concentration (BAC) by as much as 50% as opposed to drinking on an empty stomach

          Carbonated alcohol beverages are known for being absorbed very rapidly

          Women usually absorb 30-35% more of a given alcohol intake compared to men of the same size, which may explain why females often show a greater response to alcohol than males

          Very little alcohol is lost in sweat

          Alcohol can cause dehydration (so it is best to drink lots of water before, during and after drinking)

          Alcohol fails to trigger the satiety (fullness) response in the body, leading  some to overeating

          Alcohol has a high calorie content and doesn’t provide any nutritional value

 

Cookies vs. Bananas and Strawberries February 19, 2009

When we eat, we want to choose foods that are high in nutrient density. This means eating the foods that give you the highest amount of nutrients for the least amount of energy (calories). Assume we had 3 cookies in one cookiesbananas-and-strawberriesbowl and a banana and strawberries in another bowl and each bowl consisted of 150 calories. As you might conclude the bananas and strawberries are far more nutrient dense and supplies us with more nourishment per calorie.

 I believe eating more nutrient dense foods (fruits, vegetables, whole grains, brown rice…) is a better way to live. If we were to eat 2000 calories a day and it was filled with fast food, soda and candy we are going to be overweight and unhealthy. If we were to eat 2000 calories consisting of whole grains, fruits and vegetable, we would be healthier and have more energy. Some might think calories are just calories, but they aren’t. Sugar, fast food and processed products don’t offer any real nutrition leaving us tired and hungry for more. Eating fruits, vegetable and whole grains we are more likely to have more energy and feel fuller longer.

I challenge you for one week to take all the processed foods out of your life and eat more nutrient dense foods. Take note of how you feel and how much energy you have.

 

Nutrition… Before You Exercise February 17, 2009

running-pic

Do you often wonder what you should eat before a workout? It isn’t necessarily what you eat before a workout that is so important rather than what you ate the few days prior to working out. It is important to keep your body fueled on an on going basis. Therefore, what you eat just before a workout isn’t as important as what you ate the few days prior to a long run, bike ride or hike, but is still important.

 

With all that said, there are three levels of intensity:

         High intensity, shorter time; activity usually lasts an hour or less (2-5 mile run, intense workout at the gym, tennis, hockey)

         Moderate intensity, moderate time; any activity that last between 1-3 hours long (half marathon, marathon, intense cycling or hiking)

         Low intensity, longer time; anything that last longer than 3 hours (long walk, bike ride, ironman events)

 

The most important factor in eating before exercise is to make sure what you are eating is easily digestible.

For a high intensity workout it is best to fuel your body with simple carbohydrate (fruits, dates) because once you eat them they go straight to the liver for immediate energy.

For a moderate workout it is good to fuel your body with about 5% protein, 35% fat and 60% carbohydrate. A good example would be a lara bar and some apple sauce.

For a low intensity workout it is important to be more balanced and eat something that is more along the range of 10% protein, 70% fat and 20% carbohydrates. An example would be 100% whole wheat pancakes with flax seed old and a banana.

 

As you can see the first thing our body wants during an intense work out is simple carbohydrates and once that is depleted, it moves on to complex carbohydrates.

A lil note on protein:

Some people think protein is good just before a intense work out, but what they don’t know is that too much protein requires more fluid to be metabolized than carbohydrates or fat, therefore, many people suffer from muscle cramping. More so if they aren’t hydrating daily. Protein is also meant for building muscle rather than fueling it. CB061652

Keeping hydrated daily will also decrease the amount of stress that is placed on the body, which will allow the body to work harder and perform better and usually requires less recovery time.

 

Side Note: I usually try to keep these posts short and sweet and this one just got out of hand. I hope it kept your interest and maybe you learned a thing or two. Again, you have to find what works for you, but hopefully you can use this as a mini guideline.

 

Apricots February 12, 2009

Filed under: All,General,Nutritional Information — nutritiouslife12 @ 3:00 am

Apricots are one of my favorite fruits. I actually bought some died apricots this afternoon (obviosuly ones that aren’t coated in sugar).  Here are just a few reasons to keep eating them and if you don’t eat them here are a few reasons why you should eat them:

apricots

 

Water does a Body Good February 9, 2009

water

Did you know that water is more important than food? We can go weeks without food (although it is not recommended), but not more than 48 hours without water! You are probably wondering why… well water isn’t something out body can store. Instead it is something we constantly need otherwise we will not be able to function. It has been figured out that an average adult loses approximately 2.5 quarts (10 cups) a day! It is probably why you hear people say you need to drink 8-10 cups a day. We need to replace what we have lost.

Personally, I don’t think 8-10 cups is enough. 8-10 cups only replaces what we have lost, whether it is through perspiration, respiration or urination.

Below are some key reasons to up your water intake:

          Water carries nutrients to our cells

          Water aids digestion

          Water flushes out our body of wastes and keeps our kidneys healthy

          Lubricates and cushions our joints

          Water reduces inflammation

          Water regulates body temperature

          Studies have also shown that drinking water can reduce our risk of colon cancer

          Water fights fat (helps the body metabolize fat)

          Drinking water is also key to reducing water retention (you retain water when you don’t get enough water)

Now that we know the low down on water you probably want to know how much water you should drink a day. Well, if you don’t really drink water to begin with I suggest you start with the 8-10 cups a day.  (Yes you may be running to the restroom more frequently, but your body will appreciate it). fruit-in-water2

Once you are a pro at 8-10 cups a day I sugguest that you should take your weight and divide it in half and that is the minimum amount of ounces you want to drink a day.

What if you don’t really like water? Try adding lemon to your water for a lil flavor. You could also get a lil fancy and add cucumbers for a refreshing taste or even apples! Don’t be afraid to experiment! Find something that will work for you.

It also helps to have a water bottle at your desk or at home that will remind you to drink water. Next time you go out to eat have a glass of water instead of soda. For every cup of caffeine you have you should drink an extra cup of water.

Cheers!

 

 

Cinnamon February 5, 2009

cinamon

Who knew such a simple spice could be so good for you. Check out the facts on cinnamon below!

Reasons to eat cinnamon:

         might help control blood sugar, cholesterol and triglyceride levels

         studies have shown that is strengthens the cells’ sensitivity to insulin, which is important for those who may be diabetic

         suggested amount of a half teaspoon a day for 40 days might reduce blood sugar levels and triglycerides

 

Great ways to add cinnamon into your diet:

         try oatmeal with cinnamon

         toast with a little butter and cinnamon

         even some plain yogurt with cinnamon

 

**ENJOY**

 

 
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