Nutritious Life

Brining Nutrition to Daily Life

Few Facts About HFCS July 13, 2009

Filed under: All,General,Nutritional Information — nutritiouslife12 @ 3:03 pm
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Here are a few facts about HFCS (high fructose corn syrup), and why you should stay away from it:

– it is linked to obesity

– it releases the hormone, ghrelin, which tells us to keep eating

– once eaten it is metabolized quicky by the liver and turns into fat

– it is processed

– leads to higher LDL levels

You want to try and avoid HFCS products all together. You are better off grabbing a piece of fruit when you are hungry or a glass of water when you are thirsty. But most of all read any product label before you buy it. You will be surprised where you find HFCS.

If you would like to read more please check out these links below:

http://www.naturalnews.com/024466_corn_health_HFCS.html

http://www.naturalnews.com/026468_sugar_corn_corn_syrup.html

http://www.naturalnews.com/025292_corn_HFCS_food.html

 

How Alcohol is Absorbed and Metabolized February 25, 2009

 

 

A few facts about how the body absorbs and metabolizes alcohol:

 

          Alcohol does not require any digestion and is absorbed directly from the stomach and the small intestine

          Alcohol is broken down in the liver

          A small amount of alcohol is metabolized in the stomach before it has been absorbed

          Once absorbed, alcohol moves through the blood stream to the liver (where is it broken down)alcohol-picture

          An average, healthy adult metabolizes the equivalent of one drink per hour

          Drinking more than one drink per hour you expose every tissue in your body to the toxic    effects of alcohol

          Consuming foods with some fat, protein and fiber helps to slow the absorption of alcohol and can reduce blood alcohol concentration (BAC) by as much as 50% as opposed to drinking on an empty stomach

          Carbonated alcohol beverages are known for being absorbed very rapidly

          Women usually absorb 30-35% more of a given alcohol intake compared to men of the same size, which may explain why females often show a greater response to alcohol than males

          Very little alcohol is lost in sweat

          Alcohol can cause dehydration (so it is best to drink lots of water before, during and after drinking)

          Alcohol fails to trigger the satiety (fullness) response in the body, leading  some to overeating

          Alcohol has a high calorie content and doesn’t provide any nutritional value

 

Nutrition… Before You Exercise February 17, 2009

running-pic

Do you often wonder what you should eat before a workout? It isn’t necessarily what you eat before a workout that is so important rather than what you ate the few days prior to working out. It is important to keep your body fueled on an on going basis. Therefore, what you eat just before a workout isn’t as important as what you ate the few days prior to a long run, bike ride or hike, but is still important.

 

With all that said, there are three levels of intensity:

         High intensity, shorter time; activity usually lasts an hour or less (2-5 mile run, intense workout at the gym, tennis, hockey)

         Moderate intensity, moderate time; any activity that last between 1-3 hours long (half marathon, marathon, intense cycling or hiking)

         Low intensity, longer time; anything that last longer than 3 hours (long walk, bike ride, ironman events)

 

The most important factor in eating before exercise is to make sure what you are eating is easily digestible.

For a high intensity workout it is best to fuel your body with simple carbohydrate (fruits, dates) because once you eat them they go straight to the liver for immediate energy.

For a moderate workout it is good to fuel your body with about 5% protein, 35% fat and 60% carbohydrate. A good example would be a lara bar and some apple sauce.

For a low intensity workout it is important to be more balanced and eat something that is more along the range of 10% protein, 70% fat and 20% carbohydrates. An example would be 100% whole wheat pancakes with flax seed old and a banana.

 

As you can see the first thing our body wants during an intense work out is simple carbohydrates and once that is depleted, it moves on to complex carbohydrates.

A lil note on protein:

Some people think protein is good just before a intense work out, but what they don’t know is that too much protein requires more fluid to be metabolized than carbohydrates or fat, therefore, many people suffer from muscle cramping. More so if they aren’t hydrating daily. Protein is also meant for building muscle rather than fueling it. CB061652

Keeping hydrated daily will also decrease the amount of stress that is placed on the body, which will allow the body to work harder and perform better and usually requires less recovery time.

 

Side Note: I usually try to keep these posts short and sweet and this one just got out of hand. I hope it kept your interest and maybe you learned a thing or two. Again, you have to find what works for you, but hopefully you can use this as a mini guideline.

 

Food for the liver January 15, 2009

With all the junk we eat these days our liver gets overtaxed. Our liver is suppose to extract all the fat almondssoluble toxins that our kidneys can not handle. When we eat a lot of processed food (fast food, chips, cookies, cakes, frozen meals) our liver gets over worked and isn’t able to extract the toxins from the body, therefore, the fat stores within its own tissue.

 

Below are a few liver supporting foods that we should add to our daily diets:

 

         kidney beans

         raw almonds

         peas

         soybeans

         raw salads with fresh vegetables

         fruits

         leafy green vegetables

 

Next time it is 2pm in the afternoon and you want to reach for that mid afternoon snack reach for some raw almonds or some fresh fruit and a large glass of water. Water is also known to flush out toxins and cleanse the liver. Enjoy!!

 

 
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